Municipal and Institutional Solar

Solar installations transform municipal facilities and institutional buildings into cleaner, greener energy-producing powerhouses.

As municipalities and institutions make greater commitments to environmental sustainability, many are turning to solar energy solutions. Hakai specializes in designing and installing large-scale solar projects that transform idle roofs into energy-generating structures. We’ve worked across British Columbia to help colleges, universities and municipalities earn platinum STARS ratings while saving substantially on long-term energy costs.

Selected Municipal/Institutional Projects

Selkirk College

Located in Castlegar, BC, Selkirk College is dedicated to mitigating the effects of climate change and putting sustainability into the learning environment. In October of 2019, the Hakai team installed a 275-module custom solar array on the main campus building. Selkirk College is living proof that large-scale organizations can make better, future-proof decisions and lead by example.


Central Saanich Firehall

The District of Central Saanich has an ambitious vision for a low carbon community: they aim to be 100% renewable by 2050. Within three months from concept to completion, Hakai installed a 20,000 square foot custom solar array on their fire hall, with screens that display production and consumption metrics in the main lobby. The array is the largest on Vancouver Island and one of the largest in BC, and the district anticipates $450,000 in energy savings by 2045.


Nursing and Population Health Building at Thompson Rivers University

Increasing sustainability has been a major strategic goal for Thompson Rivers University, and it is the first university in Canada to earn a platinum rating from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. In 2019, Hakai installed a solar array to offset energy consumption within the 49,000 square foot, three-storey Nursing and Population Health Building in Kamloops.

Tru Kamloops


Williams Lake Campus of Thompson Rivers University

Since March 2020, the Williams Lake campus of Thompson Rivers University has had a large solar array to complement the new biomass (waste wood) and Low Carbon Electricity (LCE) heating system. Together, the campus has reached over 95% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions—bringing the university closer to its sustainability goals.

Williams Lake


School District 27

At Naghtaneqed Elementary Junior Secondary School in Nemiah Valley, diesel-electric generators had been the sole source of electrical energy for over 45 years. Hakai installed 140 high-output solar modules with a total capacity of 50kW, plus a 118 Kwh of lithium-type energy storage and 86 kW of combined inverter technologies. The solar-voltaic system has helped the Cariboo Chilcotin school greatly reduce diesel consumption, noise and pollution from the schoolyard.


Nemiah School Solar

School District 69

Located in Qualicum on central Vancouver Island, School District 69 is a role model for sustainability. The district commits to environmental sustainability through energy and water-saving programs, fuel choices and fuel efficiencies, recycling, and other measures that contribute to reducing the area’s carbon footprint. In the spring of 2016, Hakai installed a renewable energy system at the off-grid False Bay School on Lasqueti Island. Other schools in the district with solar arrays include Oceanside Elementary, Kwalikum Secondary School, Nanoose Bay Elementary and Springwood Elementary.

School District 69


Richmond Brighouse Fire Hall No. 1

Brighouse Fire Hall No. 1, in the heart of the City of Richmond, was built in 2018. At the time, the structure was designed to be a LEED Gold Certified building, and the vision included solar from the beginning. Following an extensive review process conducted between the city, a team of architects, the Roofing Association of BC, Structural and Electrical Engineers, and the firefighters themselves, Hakai Energy was awarded the contract. In July 2020, our team installed 136 solar panels on this post-disaster response center, carefully integrating the array into the rooftop structure in compliance with the strictest code requirements.

Richmond Brighouse


Vancouver Fire Hall No. 17

When complete, the Vancouver Fire Hall No. 17 will offer a 99.67% reduction in operational carbon emissions compared to the existing structure. The solar photovoltaic array, provided by Hakai, will provide this all-electric post-disaster fire hall with its total energy requirements on an annual basis. The Vancouver Fire Hall No. 17 is the first fire hall in Canada to earn the Zero Carbon Building (ZCB) design certification, and the first project to be certified in BC.